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cultural crumbs from the frontlines

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#GET THE SKINNY- LA Launch of BRIKA

A few weeks ago, us Culturites had the pleasure of attending the LA launch of  BRIKA- a website that is about to change the face of the latest DIY craze.  BRIKA is the brainchild of Canadian living Jennifer Lee Koss and Kena Paranjape who scour the globe for a constantly evolving group of incredibly talented artisans and designers who make product exclusively for BRIKA.

The launch was hosted at the private home of Diane Bald, Creative Director of Roots Canada.  Over a delicious lunch, a handful of women were walked through a personal DIY session with blogger Aimee Santos of Swellmade who taught us how to create these adorable jeweled bracelets.  While we were crafting away, all guests were asked to write how they live a well crafted life. Some responses are below:

 “Always remembering to have time to play.”

“By being conscious of the details.”

“Forever exploring and seeking new adventures.”

“Being conscious about decisions I make every day.”

“Simply, happy, organically and surrounded by family.”

“Taking moments to create and design, and sharing it with the world.”

“I love to give handmade gifts to the ones I love.”

“Carefully curating everything from my dishwares, to my flatware, to my laundry basket.”

#Gettheskinny with The Society and Skinny Cow!

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ART CRUMB:

How cool is this public art project started in New Orleans. Read about the artist and her story here.

After just one day the project took off. Before I die public walls can now be found in communities all around the globe. The artist even created a tool kit for anyone who wants to start one in their hometown - click here to order.

permalink FILM CRUMB:
vicemag:

Your Clothes Are Making Indian Cotton Farmers Commit Suicide
In the same month that 125 Bangladeshi fabric workers died in a factory fire, a film aiming to expose the tragedy of unrestricted globalized fashion called Dirty White Gold reached its Sponsume target of £18,000(about $27,000). The film begins by examining the hundreds of thousands of Indian cotton farmers who, saddled with economic hopelessness, have taken their own lives. It’s a jolly little piece. 
A Center for Human Rights and Global Justice report describes the root of the problem: At the turn of the millennium, Indian farmers who had been given access to a wider range of products after India’s market liberalization started buying genetically modified Bollgard Bt cotton seeds from the Gates Foundation-backedMonsanto corporation. The seeds were able to resist and kill the common American Bollworm cotton pest, making them an instant hit, with 85 percent of cotton grown in India being Monsanto-controlled Bt cotton by 2009.
However, the seeds were expensive, and spiralling prices (coupled with planting restrictions from the multinationals selling the seeds) led to farmers approaching money lenders for hefty loans that eventually turned into unmanageable debt. Almost 300,000 cotton workers have committed suicide to date, some of them by drinking the same insecticides they were sold by multinationals. And those suicides also bring up wider questions about the ethics of the fashion industry as a whole, in that this cotton is used in the clothes that end up absolutely everywhere. 
India’s embrace of the free market opened the floodgates for international money and, perhaps predictably, the corporatization of agriculture vanquished the need for the small-to-medium scale farmers who used to own and control the productive process. For roughly 100 rupees per day (about $1.80), these people are now contracted to spread toxic insecticides and fertilizers, often with little or no protective clothing. I called up the director ofDirty White Gold, London-based journalist Leah Borromeo, to see if the situation could possibly get any more depressing. 
Leah Borromeo interviewing Hanuman, an indebted cotton farmer
VICE: Hi, Leah. How far along into the film are you at the moment?Leah Borromeo: Some days I feel like I’m a quarter of the way done, and other days I feel like I’m only an eighth of the way done. It’s going to be out in 2014, toward the end of summer. I’ve got a deadline, so I’m trying to get everything done by then, but I can’t rush nature—quite literally, in this case.
What made you want to work on this topic in particular?I was doing it as a straightforward magazine article, but I ended up bringing a camera with me and found so many stories within that surface story. Then I found there was a real, genuine chance to express globalization, capitalism, consumerism, and all the wider political and social arguments through the medium of this story.
Yeah, you could look at it as a single issue, but obviously the problem is vast, and arguably a consequence of global capitalism.It embodies absolutely everything. Fashion is the one piece of art that people tend to consume either consciously or unconsciously. The two best foils for relating to consumerism are through food or fashion. Food is quite a niche thing, because not everybody eats meat, but everybody—for the most part—seems to wear clothes.
Continue

FILM CRUMB:

vicemag:

Your Clothes Are Making Indian Cotton Farmers Commit Suicide

In the same month that 125 Bangladeshi fabric workers died in a factory fire, a film aiming to expose the tragedy of unrestricted globalized fashion called Dirty White Gold reached its Sponsume target of £18,000(about $27,000). The film begins by examining the hundreds of thousands of Indian cotton farmers who, saddled with economic hopelessness, have taken their own lives. It’s a jolly little piece. 

A Center for Human Rights and Global Justice report describes the root of the problem: At the turn of the millennium, Indian farmers who had been given access to a wider range of products after India’s market liberalization started buying genetically modified Bollgard Bt cotton seeds from the Gates Foundation-backedMonsanto corporation. The seeds were able to resist and kill the common American Bollworm cotton pest, making them an instant hit, with 85 percent of cotton grown in India being Monsanto-controlled Bt cotton by 2009.

However, the seeds were expensive, and spiralling prices (coupled with planting restrictions from the multinationals selling the seeds) led to farmers approaching money lenders for hefty loans that eventually turned into unmanageable debt. Almost 300,000 cotton workers have committed suicide to date, some of them by drinking the same insecticides they were sold by multinationals. And those suicides also bring up wider questions about the ethics of the fashion industry as a whole, in that this cotton is used in the clothes that end up absolutely everywhere. 

India’s embrace of the free market opened the floodgates for international money and, perhaps predictably, the corporatization of agriculture vanquished the need for the small-to-medium scale farmers who used to own and control the productive process. For roughly 100 rupees per day (about $1.80), these people are now contracted to spread toxic insecticides and fertilizers, often with little or no protective clothing. I called up the director ofDirty White Gold, London-based journalist Leah Borromeo, to see if the situation could possibly get any more depressing. 


Leah Borromeo interviewing Hanuman, an indebted cotton farmer

VICE: Hi, Leah. How far along into the film are you at the moment?
Leah Borromeo: Some days I feel like I’m a quarter of the way done, and other days I feel like I’m only an eighth of the way done. It’s going to be out in 2014, toward the end of summer. I’ve got a deadline, so I’m trying to get everything done by then, but I can’t rush nature—quite literally, in this case.

What made you want to work on this topic in particular?
I was doing it as a straightforward magazine article, but I ended up bringing a camera with me and found so many stories within that surface story. Then I found there was a real, genuine chance to express globalization, capitalism, consumerism, and all the wider political and social arguments through the medium of this story.

Yeah, you could look at it as a single issue, but obviously the problem is vast, and arguably a consequence of global capitalism.
It embodies absolutely everything. Fashion is the one piece of art that people tend to consume either consciously or unconsciously. The two best foils for relating to consumerism are through food or fashion. Food is quite a niche thing, because not everybody eats meat, but everybody—for the most part—seems to wear clothes.

Continue

(via lustik)

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TRAVEL CRUMB:

luxuryaccommodations:

Cheval Blanc Randheli - Maldives

The ultimate expression of barefoot luxury in Maldives, Cheval Blanc Randheli features 45 gorgeously decorated villas appointed with designer furnishings and private infinity pools, a luxurious innovative spa with treatments by Guerlain and various superb dining options that range from the masterpieces of three-Michelin starred Chef Yannick Alléno in The 1947 to the fresh seafood-based menu of The Dilanii restaurant. The stylish resort in Noonu Atoll is scheduled to open in the summer of 2013.

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ART CRUMB:

exhibition-ism:

Joseph Parra bends the limits of portraiture with these intimate distorted works 

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The Ultimate Ski Weekend

It’s been a while since us Culturites have hit the slopes but last weekend we made it happen and flew to Big Sky, Montana with a few friends from Toronto and LA for a weekend filled with big powder and even bigger après.

Since winter is nowhere close to being over, we thought it would be most appropriate to outline our essentials that kept us warm, fed and somewhat stylish in the rugged outdoors!

On the slopes-

Skinny Cow Heavenly Peanut Butter Crisp Bars - These bites of guilt-free deliciousness are only 100 calories so you can energize up without packing on the pounds!

Skin Ceuticals- SPF 60.  Get the tinted version for a slightly bronzed glow with full protection.

Heat Factory Mitten and Boot Warmers- These little packets kept us toasty the entire day.

 Everything Canada Goose!

 

Around the fireplace-

Jacob’s Creek Moscato- Nothing like a crisp glass of wine (or a few) after a long day on the hill.  One of our fave’s is the JC. It goes very well with a game of charades!

Daneson Toothpicks- Our good friend Pete Smith is the brain behind these stylish picks. We carry them everywhere including Montana. The salted birch flavour adds such a nice touch to a beautiful charcuterie board.

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These simple and smart chairs were built by Seungji Mun, a product and furniture designer from South Korea.

The chairs, called the ‘Four Brothers’ are not only design savvy but also comfortable and sustainable. All four chairs are made from one piece of plywood with zero wasted materials.

via: www.munseungji.com

permalink ART CRUMB:
dailyartspace:

letmypeopleshow:

Hide in plain sight: Titus Kaphar at Friedman Benda

#REBLOG WEEKEND

ART CRUMB:

dailyartspace:

letmypeopleshow:

Hide in plain sight: Titus Kaphar at Friedman Benda

#REBLOG WEEKEND

(Source: letmypeopleshow)

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MUSIC CRUMBS:

Our Sunday soundtrack

freeindie:

Breakfast

imageDainty, daring.

Grizzly Adams
Scarred
Valsa Triste

permalink ART CRUMB:
lustik:

Last Available Image from Transmission Site  acrylic on canvas  2012 - Scott Greenwalt via In The Make 

ART CRUMB:

lustik:

Last Available Image from Transmission Site  acrylic on canvas  2012 - Scott Greenwalt via In The Make 

permalink ART CRUMB:
dailyartspace:

Split Cities by Jamila Hodges
#ARTIST SHOWCASE

ART CRUMB:

dailyartspace:

Split Cities by Jamila Hodges

#ARTIST SHOWCASE

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DESIGN CRUMB:

theadventuresofatticus:

Not that we need an alarm clock these days - but this app was just too tempting not to download. Its so sleek and elegant. Would almost look forward to using it;)

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TRAVEL CRUMB:

stylescoutexplore:

Wayfinding Rio style. QR codes embedded into sidewalk to provide tourist information. via Untitled Magazine

(Source: imaginingcities, via thisbigcity)